Chemical Engineering

Course Descriptions and Syllabi

 

CHEE 201: Elements of Chemical Engineering I (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Chemical engineering calculations and principles of energy and material behavior.
Prerequisites: MATH 124 or MATH 125, CHEM 151, CHEM 152, ENGR 102, ENGR 170
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 201L: Elements of Chemical Engineering I - Computational Lab (1 unit)
Demonstrates how mathematics and programming can be fundamental tools for solving complex engineering problems. Students learn how to use Visual Basic implemented in Excel to program solutions for mathematically intractable problems.
Prerequisites: MATH 124 or MATH 125, ECE 175
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 202: Elements of Chemical Engineering II (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Chemical engineering calculations and principles of energy and material behavior.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 223, CHEE 201, CHEE 201L
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 203: Chemical Engineering Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow (3 units)
Introduction to fluid mechanics and heat transfer applied to chemical engineering.
Prerequisites: CHEE 201, PHYS 141
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 301A: Chemical Engineering Lab I (1 unit)
Laboratory and computational exercises on basic chemical engineering processes.
Prerequisites: CHEE 202, CHEE 203, MATH 254
Co-requisite course: CHEE 303, CHEE 402
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 301B: Chemical Engineering Lab II (1unit)
Laboratory on transport phenomena, thermodynamics and mass transfer operations.
Prerequisites: CHEE 303, CHEE 305, CHEE 326
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 303: Chemical Engineering Mass Transfer (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Introduction to mass transfer analysis of mass transfer operations in chemical engineering, such as distillation and absorption.
Prerequisite: CHEE 203
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 305: Chemical Engineering Transport Phenomena (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Theory and calculations pertaining to fundamental transport processes.
Prerequisites: CHEE 303, CHEE 402
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 326: Chemical and Physical Equilibrium (3 units)
Applications of thermodynamics to equilibrium processes; chemical and physical equilibrium in multicomponent systems.
Prerequisites: CHEM 480A, CHEE 201
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 370L: Environmental and Water Engineering Laboratory (1 unit)
Syllabus (PDF)
Supplementary to CHEE/CE 370R (3-unit introductory environmental engineering course). Consists of a 1-unit, problem-oriented lab that meets two hours per week to provide supplementary material for non-chemical engineers taking the introductory course. Emphasis is on introducing chemistry and biochemistry concepts that support environmental engineering operations for water and wastewater treatment. Basic problem solving skills in these areas are also developed.
Prerequisite: Not open to chemical engineering students
Identical to: CE 370L
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 370R: Environmental Water Engineering (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Principles and methods of analysis of environmental engineering issues. Includes greenhouse gas effects, tropospheric air pollution, environmental air pollution, environmental risk assessment, surface and group water pollution, and drinking and wastewater treatment.
Prerequisite: CHEE 203
Special exam: Course may be taken by special exam for credit (not for grade).
Identical to: CE 370R
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 400L/500L: Water Chemistry for Engineers Lab (1 unit)
Syllabus (PDF)
Applications of canned programs for solution of complex equilibrium water chemistry problems. Graduate-level requirements include applying canned computer algorithms to solve equilibrium chemistry problems.
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 400R/500R: Water Chemistry for Engineers (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Introduction to primarily aqueous-phase equilibria governing water-quality characteristics of interest in potable water supply, wastewater treatment and natural waters. Topics include acid-base and metal-ligand equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions, and chemical reaction thermodynamics. Some emphasis on equilibria governing interphase (gas-liquid, solid-liquid) chemical distribution. Mathematical approaches to prediction of equilibrium chemical speciation are stressed. Graduate-level requirements include application of canned computer algorithms to solve equilibrium chemistry problems.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 401A/501A: Chemical and Environmental Engineering Laboratory I (1 unit)
Syllabus Part 1 (PDF) | Syllabus Part 2 (PDF)
Laboratory of environmental engineering operations.
Prerequisite: CHEE 420
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 402: Intermediate Engineering Analysis (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Solution of complex chemical engineering problems using analytical and numerical techniques.
Prerequisites: MATH 223, MATH 254, CHEE 202; concurrent registration, CHEE 303
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 413: Process Control and Simulation (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Theory of automatic control as applied to elementary chemical engineering processes. Use of continuous system simulation languages for study of practical control problems in the process industries.
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration, CHEE 402
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 415/515: Microelectronics Manufacturing and the Environment (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Presents basic semiconductor processes with direct environmental implications.
Identical to: ECE 415
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 420/520: Chemical Reaction Engineering (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Application of thermodynamic and kinetic fundamentals to the analysis and design of chemical reactors. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a current topic.
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 435/535: Corrosion and Degradation (3 units)
Science of corrosion and degradation reactions and its application to engineering problems.
Prerequisites: MSE 331R or MSE 412, or concurrent registration in CHEM 480B
Credit for: 2 units engineering science, 1 unit engineering design
Identical to: MSE 435 (MSE is home department)
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 436: Engineering Innovation (3 units)
Small advances can create major technological breakthroughs that are commercial successful: integrated circuits, DNA sequencing, and charge-coupled devices, for example. This course examines engineering innovation in three stages by (1) dissecting past breakthroughs to show how they work and how they came into existence at a particular time and place, (2) preparing a case study on a current technology to build a framework of what to look for, and (3) applying this framework to a technology on the horizon to determine what its potential might be. Course is of interest to students from all of engineering and science disciplines, and students in the humanities who have some science background and a strong interest in how technological innovation happens.
Identical to: ENGR 436, ENTR 436
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 437: Surface Science (3units)
Fundamental material, electrical and chemical properties of solid metal, semiconductor, insulator and organic surfaces applied to selected gas-solid surface chemical reactions important in semiconductor processing and heterogeneous catalysis. This course is designed to introduce students to the chemistry and physics of solid surfaces and interfaces with an emphasis on the gas-solid interface. First half of the course is devoted to learning the fundamental material, electrical and chemical properties of solid surfaces. Second half covers applying these fundamentals to topics in chemical catalysis and integrated circuit manufacture.
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate level standing in chemistry, physics or engineering.
Identical to: CHEM 437, MSE 437
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 442: Chemical Engineering Design Principles (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Preliminary economic, environmental, safety and design principles associated with chemical process equipment.
Prerequisites: CHEE 303, CHEE 326; concurrent registration, CHEE 420.
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 443 - Chemical Engineering Plant Design (3 units)
Design project from scoping and process selection through material and energy balances, equipment design and sizing, safety and environmental consideration to economic analysis of capital cost and operating expense.
Prerequisites: CHEE 420, CHEE 442
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 471/571: Rheology: Principles and Applications (3 units)
Fundamental principles of rheological behavior of materials. Non-Newtonian viscous behavior. Application of non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. Viscoelasticity. Relation between microscope structure and behavior; polymer solutions, slurries, and colloidal systems. Graduate-level requirements include use of increased experience in terms of knowledge of mathematical techniques applied to transport and phenomena problems.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate level fluid mechanics.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 473/573: Biodegradation of Hazardous Organic Compounds (3 units)
Basic principles of microbiology in relation to bioremediation of contaminated sites. Covers current research in bioremediation, and solution of common problems in bioremediation.
Identical to: CE 473/573
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 476A/576A: Water Treatment System Design (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Application of theory and engineering experience to design of unit operations for production of potable water. Covers water regulations, conventional treatment technologies and selected advance treatment topics. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper.
Identical to: CE 476A/576A
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 476B/576B: Wastewater Treatment Design System (3 units)
Application of theory and engineering experience to design of unit operations for treatment of wastewater. Covers water regulations, conventional treatment technologies and selected advanced treatment topics. Graduate-level requirements include additional homework problems, course paper, and additional exam questions.
Identical to: CE 476B
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 477L/577L: Microbiology for Engineers Lab (1 unit)
Principles of microbiology, including physiology, metabolism, genetics and ecology. Explores fundamental microbial processes and their environmental significance and application in environmental engineering. Lab is associated with lecture course to provide laboratory skills in basic and applied microbiology. Graduate-level requirements include a mandatory assignment in which course participants isolate and characterize microorganisms with specific metabolic activity. Students establish materials and methods required for the assignment individually. The assignments result in written report and oral presentation.
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration, CHEE 477R/577R
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 477R/577R: Microbiology for Engineers (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Principles of microbiology, including physiology, metabolism, genetics and ecology. Explores fundamental microbial processes and their environmental significance and application in environmental engineering. Lab is associated with lecture course to provide laboratory skills in basic and applied microbiology. Graduate-level requirements include oral reports.
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 478/578: Introduction to Hazardous Waste Management (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Management, planning, legal and engineering aspects of liquid and solid hazardous waste treatment and disposal. Graduate-level requirements include report on an in-depth review of interdisciplinary aspects of an existing project (with a non-UA engineer).
Identical to: CE 478/578
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 481A/581A: Engineering of Biological Processes (3 units)
Application of design of biological systems principles of engineering, science and mathematics, including statistics, kinetics, sensors, and bioreactor design and scale-up. Exploration of principal areas of biological engineering, such as food process engineering, tissue engineering, and large-scale fermentation processes. Graduate-level requirements include an oral presentation and belonging to the Journal Club.
Prerequisites: MATH 254, MCB 182 or MIC 205A or CHEE 450 or instructor approval
Identical to: ABE 481A/581A
Usually offered: Fall

CHEE 481B/581B: Cell and Tissue Engineering (3 units)
Application of engineering fundamentals, such as heat and mass transport, thermodynamics, kinetics, and design, to the fields of biotechnology, fermentation, food processing and bioseparation. Graduate-level requirements include two additional design projects, homework problems requiring a greater degree of mathematics, and exams containing questions that evaluate higher level thought processes.
Prerequisite: MATH 254
Identical to: ABE 481B/581B (ABE is home department)
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 482/582: Analysis of Emerging Environmental Contaminants (3 units)
Contaminants of emerging concern are major scientific and political issues. Many have been detected in air, water, soil and biota, and most are identified and quantified using nonstandardized methods, often with limited or questionable quality assurance and quality control. At times, public policy and resource allocation are based on these uncertain data. There are thousands of potential contaminants for which no analytical methodologies have been developed. Through this course, students become familiar with the diversity of analytical (instrumental) and bioanalytical (bioassay) tools currently available, and discover the pros and cons of each approach. The class also discusses future opportunities, such as development of online sensors and miniaturization of environmental methods. While the emphasis of the course is be on water analysis, the class also briefly discusses implications for other environmental matrices, such as biosolids, sediments, solids, tissues, body fluids, and aerosols. Contaminants are discussed in terms of classes (such as pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, nanoparticles, metals, disinfection byproducts) and physical chemical properties (such as water solubility, pH, volatility, molecular weight, and molecular geometry). This class provides a hands-on experience with key instrument platforms, such as gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection, inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, liquid chromatography with diode array UV, fluorescence, and mass spectrometric detection. Cellular and whole animal bioassays for the screening of complex mixtures of contaminants are discussed and demonstrated. Key principles of toxicity identification and evaluation are covered, along with real-world examples of how to determine causes of observed environmental toxicity. Students work independently and in groups to investigate a key issue relative to environmental analysis, write a paper on this topic, and present and defend their findings before the class.
Identical to: ABE 482/582 (CHEE is home department)
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 487/587: Topics in Transport Phenomena (3 units)
Syllabus (PDF)
Special topics in transport phenomena oriented towards practical applications in specific industrial and research areas. Topics include the dynamics of non-Newtonian fluids, thermal radiation, transport in multiphases systems, design of fluid transport systems, atmospheric transport and mechanics of interfaces.
Usually offered: Spring

CHEE 489/589: Trends in Nanomedicine Engineering - Fundamentals of Therapeutics and Drug Delivery Systems (3 units)
Nanomedicine engineering research involves the advance of diagnostics for rapid screening and monitoring, controlled and localized drug delivery, targeted cancer therapies, enhanced cell material interactions, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and gene delivery systems amongst others. Developments in nanomedicine engineering to effectively benefit patients require the interaction of diverse disciplines including chemistry, biochemistry, biophysics, engineering, materials science, cellular and molecular biology, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical translational medicine. This interdisciplinary course will address how materials are fabricated, characterized and interact in biological systems. The emphasis of the course will be in the application of therapeutics and controlled release drug delivery systems. Integration of biomaterial nanostructures and release analysis will be highlighted throughout the course. Through lectures, paper reviews, class discussions, experimental lab exposure, class presentations and homework assignments, students will develop an in depth understanding of the various ways nanoparticles have been used as diagnostics tools, in advancing tissue engineering and in how drug delivery systems can be improved to overcome the problems associated with typical oral and intravenous administration. Several types of drug and gene delivery methods including oral, transdermal, implantable, targeted and pulmonary will be discussed. The course will highlight the rational design of drug delivery devices based on the fundamental understanding in engineering, pharmacology, chemistry and biomaterials science.
Usually offered: Spring 

Undergraduate and Graduate Advisor

Chemical and Environmental Engineering

Michelle Wik

 

 

 

 

Contact Us

Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Phone: 520.621.1897
Fax: 520.621.6048
Email: advisor@chee.arizona.edu
1133 E. James E. Rogers Way
Harshbarger Building, Room 105C 
Tucson, AZ 85721

 

University of Arizona College of Engineering